WHO WE ARE

Katy Gavrilchuk and David Gaspard are wildlife biologists embarking on a research expedition to study whale and dolphin species of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Beginning in June 2016, the biologists will use an environmentally sound tiny home to travel to various locations throughout the coast of Eastern Canada. This tiny home will serve as their mobile research base for the four-month whale expedition.

OUR MISSION

By using a tiny home as their mobile research base, Katy and David hope to accomplish several goals. First, they want to raise awareness of the consequences of global consumption while reducing their own carbon footprint. In addition, they aim to build something that can lead by example and show others what can be accomplished with a small budget and a strong motivation.

OUR PURPOSE

Katy and David are wildlife biologists dedicating their efforts to research and conservation projects around the world, in affiliation with non-profit organizations, universities and Governments. The purpose of their 2016 summer expedition is to study whales and dolphin species, which will include tracking their habits and migration patterns.

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The Build

With the assistance of donations from Atlas EnergyShield and several other companies, Katy and David were able to build an environmentally sound tiny home that will serve as their mobile research base. It will assist in their expedition, while keeping their carbon footprint to a minimum.

The build took approximately five months—from January 2016 to June 2016—to complete the exterior and interior construction of the tiny house.

Click below to learn more about the sponsors and the build itself!

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About The Build

Katy and David’s tiny home truly would not have been possible without all of the generous sponsors and their donations. When the wildlife biologists chose the products they wanted to use to construct their mobile research base, they had several criteria but the most important one was that the companies had to be environmentally sound.

After extensive research, Katy and David found that one of the sponsors, Atlas EnergyShield®, provide insulation products that are highly energy efficient, water and fire resistant and manufactured with sustainable processes. In addition to being environmentally friendly, the insulation had to meet several other qualifications including:

• High thermal resistance: A smaller space like a tiny home can lose heat quickly and they needed to be able to use it throughout four seasons and in varying weather conditions.
• Lightweight: Since the tiny home was going to be attached to a trailer, they have to respect the maximum load capacity and save weight wherever they could, including the insulation.

Since Atlas EnergyShield did meet all of their criteria, the wildlife biologists chose the EnergyShield Pro 2 foam boards for the walls and the roof. Because of the spatial limitations, the thickness of the foam they chose was very important and had to efficiently heat the house while still being thin enough to fit the size lumber used. In addition to meeting Katy and David’s criteria, EnergyShield Pro 2 has a high R-value, Class A durable aluminum facers and water resistive barrier—all essential qualities for the mobile research base. The boards also hold a Class A fire rating and can be used for exterior CI (continuous insulation) for installation over concrete, wood, wood stud and more.

Mission


WHO WE ARE


Katy Gavrilchuk and David Gaspard are wildlife biologists embarking on a research expedition to study whale and dolphin species of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Beginning in June 2016, the biologists will use an environmentally sound tiny home to travel to various locations throughout the coast of Eastern Canada. This tiny home will serve as their mobile research base for the four-month whale expedition.

About Katy Gavrilchuk, M.ScUntitled

Katy graduated from McGill University, Montreal with a Bachelor’s in Applied Zoology and from Université Laval, Québec with a Master’s in Biology. Her master’s research focused on whether coexisting rorqual whale species segregated their trophic niche in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Québec. She is interested in pursuing terrestrial and marine mammal research to advance our understanding of the animal world and to play a role in protecting ecosystems.

 

About David 234Gaspard, B.Sc

David graduated from a professional Bio-Ecology technician program (Technique en BioÉcologie) at Cégep St. Laurent, Montreal, and completed a Bachelor’s in Biology at Université Laval, Québec. He has over 8 years of experience in biology, specializing in field sampling techniques and field work logistics. He is passionate about wildlife conservation, remote field work and nature photography.

 



OUR MISSION


By using a tiny home as their mobile research base, Katy and David hope to accomplish several goals. First, they want to raise awareness of the consequences of global consumption while reducing their own carbon footprint. In addition, they aim to build something that can lead by example and show others what can be accomplished with a small budget and a strong motivation.

While on the 670-mile journey from Montreal to Mingan, Katy and David will be making several stops in Quebec City, Tadoussac, Baie Comeau and Sept-Iles. Throughout the course of their expedition, Katy and David want to raise awareness about environmental concerns and the benefits of living smaller by giving talks in local towns about downsizing and living economically.



OUR PURPOSE


Katy and David are wildlife biologists dedicating their efforts to research and conservation projects around the world, in affiliation with non-profit organizations, universities and Governments.

The purpose of their 2016 summer expedition is to study whales and dolphin species, which will include tracking their habits and migration patterns. Along the way, the wildlife biologists will be taking samples in order to learn more about each species including the sex of the animal, measure contaminant concentrations, hormone levels, diet and genetic relatedness. While studying the whales, the wildlife biologists take pages of detailed notes in the field. From tracking a species’ location and behavior, every detail is important.